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White Girl Brown World: Our Big, Fat Guyanese Wedding

So begins day two of Guyanese Wedding-palooza. Yesterday was the maticore, the pre-wedding blessing ceremony. On tap for today is the actual wedding.

Planning for the day began early in the morning when dozens of family members took to their kitchens and backyards to cook all the food for the reception. Yes, my white brethren, you read that right. Guyanese people (at least my Guyanese people) embrace as tradition the idea of cooking all their own food for religious events. Curries of pumpkin, mango and potato are mixed in cast-iron pots the size of tractor-trailer tires. Rice is cooked and dal is boiled. No meat, however, and definitely — hold onto your flasks — no alcohol. The rum is reserved for the day after the wedding, when a Western-style wedding reception is held. More on that tomorrow.

But for today, here is the beautiful, joyous and at times raucous event I was privileged enough to attend. Click on the photos to open the slideshow.

Other Blog Posts

A Chance Encounter Explained

About a year or so ago, I was at the local hair salon, Strands, with my daughter. As she sat down to get her hair washed, I heard a familiar voice coming from the chair next to her. It was deep and friendly, booming yet not loud. When this fellow customer sat up in his seat, I made the connection — it had to be my high school chorus teacher Jim DiBenedetto.

How you can hold the memory of a voice you haven’t heard in more than 20 years is beyond me. But once I heard it my mind was sent back to those days in the second-floor Brooklyn Tech chorus room, the chorus teacher/football coach booming at us “What kind of shells?… read more

Back to the Blog

A couple of weeks ago, I finished up a year-long blog project called 365to40. I documented my march (slow slog?) to 40, which included an unexpected detour through Superstorm Sandy.

Two weeks later, blog-less, I realized two things. One, I missed the creative outlet that blogging afforded me. No editors, no assignments, just me writing about whatever the heck was knocking around in my mind at the moment. It was a free therapy session, and the feedback and support I received helped me through some tough patches.

Second, I realized that I am incredibly goal-oriented. Part of the success of 365to40 (an attempt, in the end successful, to navigate my midlife crisis) was that I was candid about what I hoped to achieve.… read more

Post-Sandy, Finding Joy in Christmas

I have very spotty memories of last Christmas: The 2-foot tall “Charlie Brown” Christmas trees in each of the kids’ rooms; crowding into my son’s room to open gifts Christmas morning; my husband’s cousin, knowing that stress had eroded my short-term memory, blessedly texting me every night to remind me to move the Elf on the Shelf.

It was far from my ideal Christmas. We were thankful, yes, for all the things we’d spent the previous two months repeating like a mantra: No one was hurt. Nothing burned. We have insurance. But I felt hogtied by reality: Our house was far from being fixed.… read more

How to Survive the Pre-Christmas Rush

I write that headline as if I am going to give you any advice on how to do this. Ha! Truth is, it’s a cry for help from someone who needs to figure out how to make that happen. Here’s my evidence:

Christmas is in less than two weeks and I, mother, wife, business owner, writing peon and editorial slave, I have yet to do any of the following things:

- Grocery shop for all the cookie baskets I dreamed I’d be making.

- Bake said cookies.

- Buy a single present for anyone I gave birth to.

- Source or write four articles that are due next week.… read more

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